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Dead Baby Dolphin

German Instagrammers were in for a shock the other day when an influencer out of Stuttgart posted a picture of a dead baby dolphin laying on ice in a cooler.  When followers of inscope21 opened up a story on his timeline what they saw left them in utter shock & horror. There was a dead baby dolphin in an icebox.

 

 Dead baby dolphin problems

  Germany is one of the many nations who has signed off on the worldwide whale hunting ban back in 1986.  A baby dolphin in central Europe is a breach of international law.  It’s illegal and raises many suggestible questions about the excessiveness of the influencer culture.  Like who hunted the poor creature? Is inscope21 affiliated with a network of black-market meat dealers?

Who is Inscope21?

  So who exactly is inscope21? But the main question is why does he have a dead baby dolphin?  Don’t get me wrong, something of this sort is definitely in the Instagrammers budget.  That is to say, he can definitely afford it.  He has a youtube following of over 2 million and an Instagram following of 1.5 million. Some would say that inscope21 is possibly one of the most successful influencers in Germany.  He flaunts his luxury lifestyle.
Dead baby dolphin inscope21 controversy
Instagram inscope21
 Outraged ensued.  Angry germans from all over the internet flaunted to his pages.  There was even the hint of a possibility that he’d been investigated by the German police.  It goes too far for the german people to bare and crosses a proverbial line.

It was all a massive hoax

  Finally Inscope21 released a statement about the poor dolphin.  Apparently the entire thing was a hoax.  A video was released of the production process of the baby dolphin.  We all got to see the truth and to say it bluntly it made us all feel a little like fools for the uproar.  I mean the entire video was a fake and the following shit storm that ensued was premeditated well-calculated publicity.  A ploy if you will to gain more attention.  The way that social media and the internet function is off one unlikely shitstorm after the next.

How did he make the dead baby dolphin doll?

  There is a video that shows how he made the dolphin.   He used a 3D printer to print the dolphin out of silicone. In the video you can see step by step the way in how the thing was first designed.  It starts with a professional 3D CGI artist to do the model.  After that we see the actual printing of the silicone rubber fake and then airbrushed to give it that lifelike air of reality.
     Despite the pure fact that it looks like a real dead baby dolphin.  It was an ingenious stunt at publicity.  Even if public relations land you in hot water, business is business and even if people are talking shit about you, at least they are talking about you.  It’s better to be hated than to be ignored apparently in the Instagramosphere.

 Bringing awareness to industry farming

  He’d apparently worked the stunt with “followfish” which is an online food delivery firm working towards 100% ecological animal-friendly farming and whatnot.  Inscope21 in his statement video said that though he was personally not a vegan he wanted to start with the important subjects of how industrial farming has affected our nourishment and healthy lifestyles. He wanted to draw more and more attention to factory farming. The question was “what do we eat and why do we eat it?” 
    The dolphin video seemingly helped him reinforce what he had set out to do and what he was meaning to accomplish.  It certainly raised a lot of questions. Germany is the #1 consumer of pig meat which has become an ongoing industrial problem on a massive scale.  He asks in his statement:

“What is the difference between a baby dolphin or a piglet.”

Written by David Hovsepian

The Grand Hierophant

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